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 NXP Semiconductors


  • Touch Motor Controller using Schmitt Trigger

  • Created: Feb 24, 2014

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Summary

A motor controller is a device or group of devices that serves to govern in some predetermined manner the performance of an electric motor. A motor controller might include a manual or automatic means for starting and stopping the motor, selecting forward or reverse rotation, selecting and regulating the speed, regulating or limiting the torque, and protecting against overloads and faults. The circuit is design for a DC Motor control which the Schmitt trigger usually is involve. The Schmitt trigger output increases to a steady maximum when the input rises above a certain threshold, and decreases almost to zero when the input voltage falls below another threshold.


The 74LVC1G17 provides a buffer function with Schmitt trigger input. It is capable of transforming slowly changing input signals into sharply defined outputs.


The input can be driven from either 3.3V or 5V devices. This feature allows the use of this device in a mixed 3.3 V and 5 V environments. This device is fully specified for partial power-down applications using IOFF. The IOFF circuitry disables the output, preventing the damaging backflow current through the device when it is powered down.


Every electric motor has to have some sort of controller. The motor controller will have differing features and complexity depending on the task that the motor will be performing. The simplest case is a switch to connect a motor to a power source, such as in small appliances or power tools. The switch may be manually operated or may be a relay or contactor connected to some form of sensor to automatically start and stop the motor. The switch may have several positions to select different connections of the motor. This may allow reduced-voltage starting of the motor, reversing control or selection of multiple speeds. Overload and overcurrent protection may be omitted in very small motor controllers, which rely on the supplying circuit to have overcurrent protection. Small motors may have built-in overload devices to automatically open the circuit on overload. Larger motors have a protective overload relay or temperature-sensing relay included in the controller and fuses or circuit breakers for overcurrent protection. An automatic motor controller may also include limit switches or other devices to protect the driven machinery.

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